Monday, May 23, 2016

Avenged Sevenfold: Metal's Monster Comeback


Billboard posted an article on how metal and hard rock are experiencing a resurgence and "renewed prominence in the musical landscape" and Avenged Sevenfold is mentioned. You can read some excerpts below.


The economics are another positive as the talent pool offers up scores of acts with significant name recognition but not the hefty price tags. “A lot of these bands have been around for a long time, they’ve got very loyal and rabid fan bases that come out and support their bands,” says Litvag, who believes affordable pricing allows producers to stack the deck without busting the budget. “Avenged Sevenfold, Slipknot, those bands work in our financial model and — in the past at least — bands like Red Hot Chili Peppers just don’t,” he adds. “Ultimately, it allows us to keep our financial model in check and not have to jack ticket prices up so much to where we have to leave our fans at home because they can’t afford to come. That would be a devastating blow if we did that.”

Meanwhile, Wimmer sees signs of hard rock music’s rising cultural impact everywhere, from the branding for craft beers to metal-influenced imagery in craft beers and vape shops to the emergence of hipster metal and an arena-level rebound for Slayer. “Nirvana didn’t break alternative, there was something already brewing and Nirvana was just the band that you could point out,” he says.  “Go to your grocery store, there’s metal imagery everywhere. Foo Fighters are selling out stadiums, that’s a rock act. Black Keys is a rock act, Jack White is a rock act. I want AWOL Nation and Kings Of Leon playing with Avenged Sevenfold; it’s good for music and it will help grow both sides. The key is to keep investing in all the genres and subgenres. How many times can Red Hot Chili Peppers play a dance event?”